Three Bad Shots And One Good Shot Still Make Par

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Posted by Dexter Francois | Posted in , , , | Posted on Friday, May 13, 2011

In my case, it was four bad shots and one good shot that got me a par on the Indian Bend Golf Course, at Camelback Golf Club. I got out early yesterday with Bryce and Zeb. It's getting hotter and hotter by the day, so it's always best to get out before the sun becomes unbearable.

Walter Hagan is known as one of the best golfers of all times. He was an entertainer who lived everyday to the fullest, indulged in the "good life", and was a fierce competitor who wasn't satisfied unless he won.

Hagen was also known for hitting a lot of bad shots. It would have  been interesting to see Hagen and Seve Ballesteros play each other in a match play event. Both were known for hitting wayward shot after wayward shot, but still walking away with par or better.

In the movie, Bobby Jones: Stroke Of Genius, Hagen's character is talking with Jones' character about his style of play. He says, "Now what you have to understand Bobby is that three bad shots and one good shot still make par. You see Golf is the game of recovery."

I experienced this yesterday on the par 5, 540 yard, 13th hole. I pulled my tee shot well left of the fairway into the trees. I ended up on a dirt patch and chunked it badly but it got into the rough lining the fairway.

Despite being in the rough, I had a good line into the green. I had more trees to the left but it shouldn't have been a problem. But they were. I pulled a hybrid and the ball made a b-line towards the woods. Somehow the ball ricocheted off a branch and back into the fairway, leaving me a 40 foot pitch.

Pretty disgusted with myself, I walked up to my ball and all of a sudden a calm came over me. I have been practicing my chipping and pitching a lot lately and as I sized up my shot, I felt like I was in a familiar place. I thought to myself, "I've made this shot before in practice. Do it now."

I picked the spot I wanted to land the ball. Took a couple practice swings to get the feel of the shot and then hit the shot. It landed left of where I aimed it but took an awkward bounce to the right and then trickled up to the hole and in for a par.

So what did I learn from this? Never give up on a hole. There have been times when I hit bad tee shots, and that's it. The hole is over. I'm expecting a double, even triple bogey. The pros hit tons of bad shots but they never pack it in. They are always scrambling. Now I understand.

Indian Bend golf course is a great course to play. The fairways are pretty much flat as are the greens. Made for a decent putting day. No 3-putts for the entire round. With only one double bogey, I shot an 81. The best score I have ever posted.

And while we're on the subject of good putting. Although I had that great chip in, I have to say that the shot of the day goes to Bryce. We were on the par 3, 11th hole, which was playing 139 yards to the flag. We all hit the green, but Bryce pulled his a little and ended up near the fringe, 60 feet away from the cup.

Bryce looked over his putt, trying to find the line. This was definite 3-putt range. He took his stance, swung back and through, and the ball started towards the hole. It seemed as if time stood still and everything went quiet as the ball made its way up to the hole. The ball had perfect pace and just fell over the edge for a two. Great birdie!

I'm looking forward to playing The Padre Course which the other eighteen hole track that is apart of Camelback Golf Club. As I was driving past the course, I noticed that the fairways and greens are bit more uneven and undulating. It makes for a pretty scene, but will probably be a bit more challenging.

So an 81. Almost made my goal of breaking 80. A few putts just skirted the edges. I hit few bad chip shots, but I feel that I'm close. Like Walter Hagen, I have to remember that the hole isn't over until the ball falls into the cup. And... that I can recover from anything. Good advice in golf and in life. Have a great round and always hit your target.



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Posted: 5/12/2011 Share on Facebook
Camelback Golf Club (Indian Bend Course) Tees: Beige, Slope: 119, Rating: 69.6
Attested By: Matt Bryson


Indian Bend Course Front Nine
Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Out
Par
4
5
3
4
4
5
4
3
4

36

6 5 3 4 4 5 5 4 5
41
FIR:

# Putts: 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 2
15
GIR:


Back Nine
Hole 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
In
Par
4
3
4
5
4
3
4
4
5

36

5 3 5 5 5 4 4 4 5
40
FIR:

# Putts: 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 2 1
15
GIR:


Pars: 10
Bogeys: 7
Doubles: 1
Par 3 Avg: 3.5
Par 4 Avg: 4.7
Par 5 Avg: 5.0
FIR: 6 / 14
GIR: 5 / 18
Putts: 30
Putts per GIR: 2.0
Scrambling: 5 / 13
Bounce Backs: 4 / 8


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Comments (2)

  1. May 13, 2011 at 6:50 PM

    Several poor shots and one miracle for a par is not the best approach to golf but does emphasise the need to keep a positive mental attitude and not let a poor shot or bad break get you down. By the time you hit your next shot, the previous shot should be forgotten and strategy laid out to hit a good recovery. Always keep positive swing thoughts and trust your swing to accomplish what you realistically determine what you want to accomplish on your shot.

    http://hittingthegolfball.com

  2. May 13, 2011 at 7:31 PM

    That's what I took away from the whole experience. I try to let the last shot go and just focus on the one at hand. Whenever my attention is on what a bad shot I made on the previous swing, my next shot is sure to be just as bad. Good advise Denny.